Saturday, May 28, 2016

Dryocampa Rubicunda, or Rosy Maple Moth

I had just put the strings on my lamppost for my clematis to climb. I walked away, and when I returned I could hardly believe my eyes. There, on the strings, was a pastel yellow and pink striped moth, with a fuzzy yellow head. I wasn't sure it was real. I got in close and snapped some shots. The only thing I could think to name it was the ice cream moth, like it was made of strawberry and vanilla ice cream. Perfect for the warm summer-like weather!

It is actually a moth of the Saturniid Family, named Rosy for its color and Maple for the type of trees it eats in its caterpillar stage. It is nocturnal, and comes out in the late afternoon which is when I found it. What a magical finding. I'd say it's a sign that this upcoming summer will be filled with magic.



Those that don't believe in magic will never find it.
{Roald Dahl)
Rosy maple moths inhabit temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America. They are most often associated with red maples (Acer rubrum), sugar maples (Acer saccharum), silver maples (Acer saccharinum), turkey oaks (Quercus laevis) and box elder maples (Acer negundo). Depending on where their host trees are, rosy maple moths have also been found in suburban areas. ("The Green Striped Maple Worm", 1971; Cotinis, 2004; Hyche, 2000; Opler, et al., 2012; VanDyke, 2006)
Rosy maple moths inhabit temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America. They are most often associated with red maples (Acer rubrum), sugar maples (Acer saccharum), silver maples (Acer saccharinum), turkey oaks (Quercus laevis) and box elder maples (Acer negundo). Depending on where their host trees are, rosy maple moths have also been found in suburban areas. ("The Green Striped Maple Worm", 1971; Cotinis, 2004; Hyche, 2000; Opler, et al., 2012; VanDyke, 2006)
Rosy maple moths inhabit temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America. They are most often associated with red maples (Acer rubrum), sugar maples (Acer saccharum), silver maples (Acer saccharinum), turkey oaks (Quercus laevis) and box elder maples (Acer negundo). Depending on where their host trees are, rosy maple moths have also been found in suburban areas. ("The Green Striped Maple Worm", 1971; Cotinis, 2004; Hyche, 2000; Opler, et al., 2012; VanDyke, 2006)