Saturday, May 28, 2016

Dryocampa Rubicunda, or Rosy Maple Moth

I had just put the strings on my lamppost for my clematis to climb. I walked away, and when I returned I could hardly believe my eyes. There, on the strings, was a pastel yellow and pink striped moth, with a fuzzy yellow head. I wasn't sure it was real. I got in close and snapped some shots. The only thing I could think to name it was the ice cream moth, like it was made of strawberry and vanilla ice cream. Perfect for the warm summer-like weather!

It is actually a moth of the Saturniid Family, named Rosy for it's color and Maple for the type of trees it eats in its caterpillar stage. It is nocturnal, and comes out the late afternoon which is when I found it. What a magical finding. I'd say it's a sign that this upcoming summer will be filled with magic.



Those that don't believe in magic will never find it.
{Roald Dahl)
Rosy maple moths inhabit temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America. They are most often associated with red maples (Acer rubrum), sugar maples (Acer saccharum), silver maples (Acer saccharinum), turkey oaks (Quercus laevis) and box elder maples (Acer negundo). Depending on where their host trees are, rosy maple moths have also been found in suburban areas. ("The Green Striped Maple Worm", 1971; Cotinis, 2004; Hyche, 2000; Opler, et al., 2012; VanDyke, 2006)
Rosy maple moths inhabit temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America. They are most often associated with red maples (Acer rubrum), sugar maples (Acer saccharum), silver maples (Acer saccharinum), turkey oaks (Quercus laevis) and box elder maples (Acer negundo). Depending on where their host trees are, rosy maple moths have also been found in suburban areas. ("The Green Striped Maple Worm", 1971; Cotinis, 2004; Hyche, 2000; Opler, et al., 2012; VanDyke, 2006)
Rosy maple moths inhabit temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America. They are most often associated with red maples (Acer rubrum), sugar maples (Acer saccharum), silver maples (Acer saccharinum), turkey oaks (Quercus laevis) and box elder maples (Acer negundo). Depending on where their host trees are, rosy maple moths have also been found in suburban areas. ("The Green Striped Maple Worm", 1971; Cotinis, 2004; Hyche, 2000; Opler, et al., 2012; VanDyke, 2006)

Friday, May 20, 2016

Owl Whisperer


I've been communicating with Owls. This is a clip of one of our conversations:


Learning to communicate has been a process. On a hike a couple of months ago, I heard an owl hooting and I hooted back. To my surprise it came to me, a Barred Owl, landing in a nearby tree. I wasn't able to snap a shot of it, as it was hidden in an evergreen, but I saw it as it swooped in silently.

Then, I began to hear the owl at the same time, and in the same location, everyday on the late afternoon walks I take after finishing up my tutoring assignments. So, one day I decided to hoot again, and sure enough it came and alighted in a nearby tree. It left me a feather, too.


I now visit the area daily, it is nearby a swamp which I have named, Owl Swamp. The owl has visited me countless times. Of course the above video shows my most prized visitation, when two owls presented themselves.


In his iconic book, Animal Speak, Ted Andrews says of owls:

"Often those with an owl as a power totem have a unique ability to see into the eyes and soul of others. Often these perceptions are discarded as wild imaginings or with such phrases as "What in the world would I think that about this person?" These kinds of imaginings, positive and negative, should be trusted."



I have been thinking about communication ever since. I have decided not to discount the feelings I get when communicating with others, even if they don't match what is being said.

Owl is teaching me a valuable lesson, and I am grateful to be its student.




Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Ephemerals of the Forest


Ephemeral:

(n.) lasting for a very short time
Trillium Erectum, or Wake-Robin


Trillium Undulatum, or Painted Lady

Claytonia Virginica, or Fairy Spud

Erythronium, or Trout Lily

Dicentra, or Wild Bleeding Heart


Viola, or Wild Yellow Violet

Arisaema triphyllum, or Jack in the Pulpit


Thursday, May 5, 2016

Queen of the World

Yes! I am the Queen of the World.
{M.S. Burrell}

For a long time, when walking through the forest, I have noticed queens' crowns. I imagine they belong to the Queen Mother herself, Mother Earth.

With my new spring walking (I used to leave the forest in spring, as ticks appeared) the crowns have stood out more than ever. I started snapping shots of them as I went along in early April, and as I continue to photograph them, I have noticed jewels from nature are beginning to appear.

In tribute to Mother's Day, and to honor the new moon in earth sign Taurus on May sixth, I thought I would share some of the wondrous crowns I am finding.

Perhaps I shall begin to embellish some along the way; nevertheless, each have extraordinary details all on their own.
Crown & Sceptre

Fit for a Queen

Queen's Sunday Best

Warrior Queen

Crowning Glory

Party Crown

Crown Jewels

Everyday she imagined placing a beautiful crown upon her head to remind herself she was powerful, resourceful, intelligent, and wise woman worthy of her own admiration. {QueenofYourOwnLife.com}

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Endure


I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness because it shows me the stars.{Og Mandino}


Sunday, April 24, 2016

Gifted

Pleasure is spread through the earth
In stray gifts to be claimed by whoever shall find.
{William Wordsworth, 1806}